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History Australia | A Knowledge & Documentary Channel

History Australia is a TV broadcaster located in Australia. It’s an entertainment channel that airs programs and documentaries devoted to historical figures and events. You can watch the channel online via its video-on-demand collection, updated regularly. See our History AU review below, done with an emphasis on its streaming.

Name: History Australia
Location: Australia
Genre: Entertainment > Knowledge & Documentary
Website: History AU Homepage

If you want to learn more about History AU than what’s in our review, use the buttons in the ‘Visit this station around the web’ box. If you’re interested in a different channel or stream, use the search box at the top of the page.

Review of History Australia

7.8

Streaming:

  • - Video On Demand

History AU’s rating of 7.8 out of 10 is based on a number of factors. One of the biggest ‘pros’ is the channel’s video collection, giving viewers access to watch on demand. However, there’s no History Australia live stream available, losing the channel some points. More about our rating method.

See how History Australia stacks up against other documentary channels in Australia.

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Sneak peek!

Did you know that Auckland sits on an active volcanic field and is known as the City of Volcanoes? Neil Oliver uncovers some of the secrets of New Zealand's own Pompeii.

Auckland and surrounds on Episode 4 of #CoastNewZealand, tonight at 8.30pm AEST.
#Motutapu #NewZealand
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Amanda Ayres, Yugender Reddy Allam and 23 others like this

Fay CameronFascinating piece of history.

17 hours ago   ·  1
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Grace TockerIshbel, oh god my volcanic eruption worries before my flight 😂

9 hours ago
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Gjames ThurstonGood fishing around there too !

13 hours ago
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HISTORY added 3 new photos.

New Zealand’s largest city is also the most coastal city in the country. Few cities in the world also have a stronger claim to the title “City of Volcanoes” than Auckland. Over fifty have erupted within 20 kilometres of the central city.

Maori call this narrow isthmus of fertile land between two abundant harbours Tamaki Makaurau - the place desired by many, or the more lyrical 'Tamaki - the bride sought by a hundred suitors'

Auckland's hundreds of kilometres of coastlines and its many bays, inlets and creeks mean that most Aucklanders live within 5 kilometres of the sea.

Coast New Zealand, tomorrow at 8.30pm AEST.
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New Zealand’s largest city is also the most coastal city in the country. Few cities in the world also have a stronger claim to the title “City of Volcanoes” than Auckland. Over fifty have erupted within 20 kilometres of the central city.

Maori call this narrow isthmus of fertile land between two abundant harbours Tamaki Makaurau - the place desired by many, or the more lyrical Tamaki - the bride sought by a hundred suitors

Aucklands hundreds of kilometres of coastlines and its many bays, inlets and creeks mean that most Aucklanders live within 5 kilometres of the sea. 

Coast New Zealand, tomorrow at 8.30pm AEST.

Bev McGuinness, Pamela Nash and 23 others like this

Tracey LouI miss foxtel 😩

15 hours ago
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Tracey LouMmm take me to new Zealand 😍😍😍

15 hours ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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#ThisDayInHistory – 29 May 1953 – Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Conquer Everest

On 29 May 1953 the summit of the world’s tallest peak, Mount Everest, was reached for the first time by two relatively unknown mountaineers – Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tenzing Norgay of Nepal. Their names became famous almost overnight as the news of their achievement was flashed around the world.

Mt Everest towers an incredible 8,848 metres (29,028 feet) above sea level. Known to the Nepalese as Sagarmāthā – meaning “Forehead in the Sky”, the mountain is revered by locals of the area, both from Nepal and Tibet.

The idea of climbing this towering rock edifice had fascinated humans for many years and this fascination translated into actual attempts to reach the summit going back to the 1920’s – usually performed by adventurous British mountaineers who formed organised expeditions. However logistics, lack of oxygen, avalanches and frequent bursts of appalling weather defeated each of these attempts with several climbers dying in the process.

Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were able to change all this when they planted four flags on the summit on 29 May 1953 – achieving world-wide fame and a permanent place in the history books as the first mountaineers to reach the peak of Everest.

The two were part of the ninth British expedition to attempt an ascent, an expedition led by Colonel John Hunt, a military officer and mountaineer who had been selected by the financiers supporting the attempt. There was growing international competition to be the first country to succeed and the French and Swiss were also making determined preparations.

However the British were able to set up a base camp at the foot of the mountain on 12 April 1953 and then slowly conduct their ascent through establishing a series of higher camps, finally reaching camp V11 at 24,000 ft on 17 May.

Hunt then sent Hillary and Tenzing up for a final assault on the summit on 28 May, and finally at 1130 am the next day, the pair succeeded where everyone before had failed when they reached the very top of Everest.

Their success rapidly became world news on 2 June – coinciding with the coronation of Queen Elizabeth 11 in Westminster Abbey. Later that year Hillary was knighted for his effort and Tenzig Norgay received the George Medal from the British Government.

Image: A portrait of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay – the first climbers to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. Source: Wikimedia Commons
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#ThisDayInHistory – 29 May 1953 – Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Conquer Everest

On 29 May 1953 the summit of the world’s tallest peak, Mount Everest, was reached for the first time by two relatively unknown mountaineers – Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tenzing Norgay of Nepal. Their names became famous almost overnight as the news of their achievement was flashed around the world. 

Mt Everest towers an incredible 8,848 metres (29,028 feet) above sea level. Known to the Nepalese as Sagarmāthā – meaning “Forehead in the Sky”, the mountain is revered by locals of the area, both from Nepal and Tibet.

The idea of climbing this towering rock edifice had fascinated humans for many years and this fascination translated into actual attempts to reach the summit going back to the 1920’s – usually performed by adventurous British mountaineers who formed organised expeditions. However logistics, lack of oxygen, avalanches and frequent bursts of appalling weather defeated each of these attempts with several climbers dying in the process.

Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were able to change all this when they planted four flags on the summit on 29 May 1953 – achieving world-wide fame and a permanent place in the history books as the first mountaineers to reach the peak of Everest.

The two were part of the ninth British expedition to attempt an ascent, an expedition led by Colonel John Hunt, a military officer and mountaineer who had been selected by the financiers supporting the attempt. There was growing international competition to be the first country to succeed and the French and Swiss were also making determined preparations.

However the British were able to set up a base camp at the foot of the mountain on 12 April 1953 and then slowly conduct their ascent through establishing a series of higher camps, finally reaching camp V11 at 24,000 ft on 17 May.

Hunt then sent Hillary and Tenzing up for a final assault on the summit on 28 May, and finally at 1130 am the next day, the pair succeeded where everyone before had failed when they reached the very top of Everest.

Their success rapidly became world news on 2 June – coinciding with the coronation of Queen Elizabeth 11 in Westminster Abbey. Later that year Hillary was knighted for his effort and Tenzig Norgay received the George Medal from the British Government.

Image: A portrait of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay – the first climbers to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Don Hutson, Barbara Jan Lawson and 23 others like this

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Graham BanksInteresting to note that in the pic, both of them are wearing 2 oxygen tanks, as a precaution and prepared for the lack of oxygen at that height......maybe experiments in the plane flying over the peaks, as far as the air to breathe was concerned.....how scientific........

16 hours ago
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John O'ReillyHow about the cameraman who ended up living in Emerald, Victoria. I heard him being interviewed a few years ago on the ABC.

2 days ago   ·  5

1 Reply

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Tony PorterPeople will keep climbing MT EVEREST for years to come people will die time to give EVEREST a break for a few years it won't go anywhere

2 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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Greg McCartneyBack when there were no guide ropes...

1 day ago
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Erikh Wrigleyaparently he was a complete dick but he was the first to be a cock on the mountain

2 days ago

2 Replies

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George Graham MillerThis may have been the first "selfie". I remember as a boy this magnificent achievement.

2 days ago
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Fred AnthesThe mystery of whether Mallory made it to the summit in 1924 is still not solved ?

17 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Joel SachThose dudes should have left a sign saying "danger!!!! No people. Turn back " climb that thing you got a death wish or you a bit slow in the head eh?

17 hours ago

1 Reply

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Metalman MickRead 'Everest: The First Ascent'... It's about the scientist Griffith Pugh that made it happen..

22 hours ago
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Gail CallaghanSir Edmund Hillary is on the New Zealand five dollar note.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Diane ParsonsSir Edmund, not Edward

2 days ago   ·  11
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Deb GrayTenzig pulled Hillary up so legend has it....

1 day ago
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Roeg EwingtonI always thought norgay got there first

1 day ago

1 Reply

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Gjames ThurstonAnother famous Kiwi, Heaps more too!

2 days ago
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Greg EllisMy ultimate hero.

2 days ago
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Sophia MorleyShenée McLean Everest

2 days ago   ·  1
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#ThisDayInHistory – 28 May 1999 - The Last Supper Back on Display

On this day in 1999, after two decades of restoration, Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic painting The Last Supper in the refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Italy, was once again put on display.

Known as the quintessential Renaissance Man, Leonardo da Vinci began work on The Last Supper in 1495, and completed it four years later in 1498. An imposing 460 by 880 centimetres, the scene depicts the reactions of the disciples the moment when Jesus reveals that one of them will betray him. Each disciple responds with very human emotions and with varying degrees of shock, incredulity, anger, and horror that define their individual personalities. Despite the chaos of the subject, Leonardo imposed a strict sense of order typical of the High Renaissance. Jesus’ head—framed by the halo-like architectural detail behind him—is the vanishing point toward which all perspective lines throughout the composition converge; every element of the painting directs the viewer’s attention back to him, as he remains calm in the centre of the emotional storm.

To convey the psychological drama of the scene, Leonardo wanted to use a variety of deep colours and contrast. However, traditional fresco painting techniques couldn’t adequately capture the intensity he desired. Ever the inventor, he decided to experiment. Instead of using the traditional tempera on wet plaster—which had been used for centuries—he tried dry plaster. His experiment did in fact yield a more varied palette, so he commenced his painting. However, his new experimental method was not as durable as the traditional one. Almost immediately, the painted plaster began to flake off the wall.

Already by 1556, Giorgio Vasari described the mural as "ruined." Over the years, the mural suffered from many poor restoration attempts and disasters. One restorer filled in missing sections with oil paint and varnished the entire painting, and another stripped the varnish off and repainted the entire thing. In 1796, French troops threw rocks at it and scratched the disciples’ eyes out. In 1821 someone tried to move it, only to damage it before he discovered that it was not, in fact, a traditional fresco. During World War II, a bomb destroyed most of the building, but the wall with The Last Supper survived, albeit with a bit of damage from vibrations.

By 1978, only 20 percent of the original painting remained. A restoration project led by Pinin Brambilla Barcilon aimed to permanently stabilise the mural and reverse the damage inflicted from previous restoration attempts. The refectory was sealed and converted to a climate controlled environment. Using the latest scientific technology, the restoration team removed everything that had been added after Leonardo completed the painting in 1498. The process was meticulous and extremely slow. Often, only an area the size of a postage stamp was cleaned in one day. The areas deemed irreparable were repainted with subdued colours, so viewers can distinguish them from the original painting. For these sections, the restoration team referred to Leonardo’s original sketches and a reproduction of The Last Supper painted by Giampietrino around 1520.

After 21 years of restoration—four times longer than it took Leonardo to paint it—The Last Supper was once again put on display on 28 May 1999. The refectory remains well protected with a sophisticated air filtration system, and the number of visitors and visiting time is restricted.

Like many high profile restoration projects, The Last Supper’s restoration met much criticism. While some claim the painting has once again regained its original "life and light," others believe the restoration was too dramatic. Regardless, five centuries after Leonardo painted this fragile masterpiece that immediately began to disintegrate, the painting still inspires literature, art, pop culture, as well as the devout.

Credit: © Leemage
Caption: The restoration of "The Last Supper" took four times longer than it took Leonardo to paint it.
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#ThisDayInHistory – 28 May 1999 - The Last Supper Back on Display

On this day in 1999, after two decades of restoration, Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic painting The Last Supper in the refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Italy, was once again put on display. 

Known as the quintessential Renaissance Man, Leonardo da Vinci began work on The Last Supper in 1495, and completed it four years later in 1498. An imposing 460 by 880 centimetres, the scene depicts the reactions of the disciples the moment when Jesus reveals that one of them will betray him. Each disciple responds with very human emotions and with varying degrees of shock, incredulity, anger, and horror that define their individual personalities. Despite the chaos of the subject, Leonardo imposed a strict sense of order typical of the High Renaissance. Jesus’ head—framed by the halo-like architectural detail behind him—is the vanishing point toward which all perspective lines throughout the composition converge; every element of the painting directs the viewer’s attention back to him, as he remains calm in the centre of the emotional storm. 

To convey the psychological drama of the scene, Leonardo wanted to use a variety of deep colours and contrast. However, traditional fresco painting techniques couldn’t adequately capture the intensity he desired. Ever the inventor, he decided to experiment. Instead of using the traditional tempera on wet plaster—which had been used for centuries—he tried dry plaster. His experiment did in fact yield a more varied palette, so he commenced his painting. However, his new experimental method was not as durable as the traditional one. Almost immediately, the painted plaster began to flake off the wall. 

Already by 1556, Giorgio Vasari described the mural as ruined. Over the years, the mural suffered from many poor restoration attempts and disasters. One restorer filled in missing sections with oil paint and varnished the entire painting, and another stripped the varnish off and repainted the entire thing. In 1796, French troops threw rocks at it and scratched the disciples’ eyes out. In 1821 someone tried to move it, only to damage it before he discovered that it was not, in fact, a traditional fresco. During World War II, a bomb destroyed most of the building, but the wall with The Last Supper survived, albeit with a bit of damage from vibrations. 

By 1978, only 20 percent of the original painting remained. A restoration project led by Pinin Brambilla Barcilon aimed to permanently stabilise the mural and reverse the damage inflicted from previous restoration attempts. The refectory was sealed and converted to a climate controlled environment. Using the latest scientific technology, the restoration team removed everything that had been added after Leonardo completed the painting in 1498. The process was meticulous and extremely slow. Often, only an area the size of a postage stamp was cleaned in one day. The areas deemed irreparable were repainted with subdued colours, so viewers can distinguish them from the original painting. For these sections, the restoration team referred to Leonardo’s original sketches and a reproduction of The Last Supper painted by Giampietrino around 1520. 

After 21 years of restoration—four times longer than it took Leonardo to paint it—The Last Supper was once again put on display on 28 May 1999. The refectory remains well protected with a sophisticated air filtration system, and the number of visitors and visiting time is restricted. 

Like many high profile restoration projects, The Last Supper’s restoration met much criticism. While some claim the painting has once again regained its original life and light, others believe the restoration was too dramatic. Regardless, five centuries after Leonardo painted this fragile masterpiece that immediately began to disintegrate, the painting still inspires literature, art, pop culture, as well as the devout. 

Credit: © Leemage 
Caption: The restoration of The Last Supper took four times longer than it took Leonardo to paint it.

Kay Galbraith, Jason South Sydney and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Michael Christian BellJesus didn't have a wife - that is the teenager John the disciple. Incidentally, the supper followed the Greek and Roman style where people ate food on reclining couches and not like the European-Western style of sitting up around a table. Obviously Da Vinci didn't understand the New Testament culture or he westernised the event deliberately.

2 days ago
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Bob NeweyVisited here two years ago only a handful of people each time allowed in. Hard to believe we sat and took in the whole scenery.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Bob NeweyThe archway under the table was a doorway someone did after the painting looks a bit wierd.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Neil John MacleanNo, she has been erased ,where the open V shape is there was a woman there

2 days ago   ·  1
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Gareth WoodJesus was a jew.of course he was married

2 days ago   ·  2
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Ina SmailInteresting the female on His right

3 days ago   ·  1
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Eduardo Yap@ Ina Ismael....😊🍷😉 nul barber 💈 shopped those days' many moon ago...😉 💈

2 days ago
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Eduardo YapIna Smail...@ no lady in that.iconic supper.😉🍷

2 days ago
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Kim HansenShe was a pretty woman Jesus's wife.

2 days ago
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Eduardo YapExcellent.😍

2 days ago
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